Buffalo-Springfield Company

 

We have taken the information on the Buffalo-Springfield Company of Springfield Ohio USA and have created a separate webpage herein. 

 

While many folks are familiar with the rock group of the 1960's "Buffalo Springfield" perhaps some don't realize that the inspiration for that group was a Buffalo-Springfield steamroller.  The roller was near the apartment of one of the band members (Frazier Mohawk) on Fountain Avenue in Los Angeles, California USA.  Frazier is said to have pried off the Buffalo-Springfield cast-iron nameplate and nailed it to the wall of the Fountain Avenue apartment he and others in the band shared.  The nameplate is pictured on the front of one of their albums.  If your webmaster were to guess, that infamous "steamroller" was likely gasoline or diesel powered, not steam powered.  However, pavement rollers are often referred to as steamrollers probably because the first ones that were of practical use were indeed steam powered. 

 

Anywho, here's the information on the actual company Buffalo-Springfield.  The first document below is a fantastic article from Engineers & Engines magazine.  The article is from a July/August 1971 edition, but the article was originally published in 1966.  When reading it you should remember that it was written in 1966, as some wording can be confusing otherwise. 

 

The first document below is the article as it was originally printed in the 1971 magazine.  That is, the scanned pages are contained in the document.  Unfortunately, the scans, even though they're a high definition scan, still are difficult to read.  Plus, there're no sub-titles, so the story is just one long section without any breaks. 

 

However, the second document below is the same article but converted to editable text via OCR (Optical Character Recognition).  That is, the scans were converted to text and pasted into a Microsoft Word document, and then formatted.  Unfortunately, the original font and font size was such that the OCR system did a poor job of converting to text.  There were many, many errors.  That, plus the original article had errors and typos, plus was in dire need of sub-titles.  So, your humble webmaster took several evenings to go through the text and, well, fix it (to put it simply).  We hope that this revised document is easier to read.  If you find that the type is too small, just adjust the document-size percentage in the Adobe PDF Reader menu. 

 

All efforts were made to reduce the document size without compromising legibility.  Thanks for reading!  Enjoy!

 

The first document is less than 3 Mb (original scans and hard to read). 

 

The second document is less than 7 Mb (OCR'd and easier to read).